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The “pressure” of OTAs

Posted by Darren Urban on June 1, 2017 – 4:32 pm

Bruce Arians was talking about a play near the end of Thursday’s OTA, a two-minute drill in which the “young guys panicked.”

“When the clock’s running, we have a certain play we go to and (expletive), they lined up all over the place,” Arians said. “Those are the type of things that get you beat.”

Arians has talked about the team being more intelligent on the field. Asked if the staff didn’t emphasize that enough last year, Arians said no, simply that the Cardinals didn’t make important plays at the end of games  — in all three phases — last season as they had in 2015.

“We made mental errors in critical situations that we hadn’t made in the past,” Arians said. “That’s been a big point of emphasis.”

Hence Arians’ issues with the mistake in the two-minute drill. This is why Arians and the Cardinals like to work on specific situations here in the heat of June — so many seconds left, the team trailing by “x” amount  of points. The Cards do it in training camp and the regular season as well, but now is when the rookies and the newbies get a taste of how Arians wants things done. Obviously, as Arians noted Thursday, the pressure can still build without pads and in shorts months from football that counts.

“I’ve seen some really bright young players that don’t make those mistakes and are calm under pressure,” Arians said. “Pressure is usually something (where) you don’t know what the hell you’re doing. That’s why you feel it. If you know what you’re doing, you never feel it.”


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3 Responses to “The “pressure” of OTAs”

  1. By shannon robinson on Jun 2, 2017 | Reply

    The OTA photos are a priceless inside view of the Cards’ Roster. So thank you all.
    T J Logan’s angle of his body to the ground is phenomenal – that’s why people say ‘cuts on a dime.’ The other noteworthy angles are in the pic of Veldheer and Boehm getting off the ball – shoulders square and level with each other – on the same foot – looking powerful. You also don’t have to ask Dansby and Riddick, ” Can you guys stand over there together for a picture? ” Impressed with the number of smiles, radiant emotions from the players. Finally the portrait of BA, SK, and Adrian sitting on the wall soaking it in. That is the joyful feeling that the team you’re putting together has ‘got it’ – I’ve felt it and know what it looks like – a little piece of heaven, like a good deed. A Tip of the Cards’ wing to our photographers!

  2. By Darren Urban on Jun 2, 2017 | Reply

    Shannon —

    RE: Photographers

    Why, thank you. 😉

  3. By carlsonchemist on Jun 3, 2017 | Reply

    Bruce Arians was talking about a play near the end of Thursday’s OTA, a two-minute drill in which the “young guys panicked.” Yet, in almost the same breath, Arians has talked about the team being more intelligent on the field. Asked if the staff didn’t emphasize that enough last year, Arians said no, simply that the Cardinals didn’t make important plays at the end of games — in all three phases — last season as they had in 2015.

    While I bow to BA’s coaching expertise, I think he was spewing out gobbly-gook. What conclusions can anyone draw from his interview? Yes, the young guys, from this year, panicked when placed in a pressure situation during OTA’s. But what is the explanation for the veterans of last year not making the plays that the Cards needed?

    If the young guys of our 2017 draft panicked, then they obviously need more coaching to negotiate high-pressure situations. I believe that BA has assembled a great coaching staff to guide the young guys when placed into high-pressure situations.

    But as much as I regard BA as a terrific coach (and the coaching staff he’s assembled), what can be done to “coach” veteran players so that they make the select few plays that are needed to win a game? High-pressure games are typically won by veteran players (not rookies).

    I applaud BA’s approach to bringing in older, more savvy, players to help develop the younger guys that represent the team’s lifeblood of tomorrow.

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