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Blogs

Patrick Peterson gives a sneak peak of 2014 #SaluteToService cleats

Posted by since1898 on June 18, 2014 – 10:53 am

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Patrick Peterson hosts “Celebs and Steaks” charity event

Posted by since1898 on June 10, 2014 – 11:45 am

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Game recognize game – Patrick Peterson and Richard Sherman [GIF]

Posted by since1898 on May 23, 2014 – 9:15 am

JerseySwap

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Back and forth with Peterson, Sherman

Posted by Darren Urban on May 22, 2014 – 6:21 pm

They played nice for a while. But then the money upped the stakes as did the success of both teams, and it was probably inevitable Patrick Peterson and Richard Sherman would go back and forth about who was a better cornerback. Certainly it is always true for Sherman, who has made it clear he is willing to talk — and often — about everything. Much of the time it is to pound his chest about how good he is. For a while, Peterson decided to be much more low key about things, although it didn’t take long talking to him that he was supremely confident in his own abilities.

Then Sherman got his huge contract extension and Peterson is in line for one himself and naturally, that has led to talk about who is better because it stands to reason Peterson wants more than Sherman got and shouldn’t that only happen if he is better?

The latest back-and-forth came when Peterson talked about Sherman and the Seahawks’ scheme compared to the Cardinals, all on Arizona Sports 98.7 during the Bickley and Marotta show.

“If you look at their scheme and you look at our scheme, he’s a Cover-3 corner, period,” Peterson told the station. “A lot of guys say he’s a shutdown corner, but if you look at film and guys who understand the game, go back and look at film and see how his defense is. I believe if you put him in our system, I don’t think he’d be able to last, honestly, because I’m asked to do much more than he is.”

That, not surprisingly, got national attention. And Sherman’s attention.

 

(I do enjoy Sherman calling Peterson “this kid.” They were both in the 2011 draft.)

Look, Peterson is going to believe he is the best. He does anyway but does it make sense for him to defer to Sherman when that could be a factor in contract talks? Obviously, there are things Sherman has that Peterson wants, like a Super Bowl title and, in many eyes, that top CB title.

Certainly, Sherman is going to believe he is the best. He does anyway and he doesn’t want anyone infringing on that piece of real estate he has so loudly tried to conquer. Peterson has some things Sherman is trying hard to make up for, like a top-five pick status (Sherman was a fifth-rounder in 2011) and some serious popularity. Sherman has made big inroads there, but the way he has gone about announcing his presence with authority has gotten him plenty of critics. Peterson, meanwhile, has taken more of the Larry Fitzgerald road to Q rating.

If nothing else, it adds another layer to the NFC West. Like the powerhouse division needs another subplot.

Never forget though, this is about raising each of their profiles as much as anything. I can’t see why they wouldn’t still trade jerseys or hug it out if they saw each other. Right?

PPSherm

UPDATE: But wait, there’s more:


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Teddy Williams moves back to CB

Posted by Darren Urban on May 15, 2014 – 10:55 am

For a couple of weeks before the draft, wide receiver Teddy Williams heard the comments from cornerbacks coach Kevin Ross and defensive coordinator Todd Bowles.

“Oh, so you played corner your whole career.”

“You’re a big dude, we’d want you over here.”

“I thought,” Williams said, “it was just jokes.”

It wasn’t. During the draft, coach Bruce Arians called Williams and the two had a “nice, long conversation” about Williams moving from receiver to cornerback. It made a lot of sense, in part because the Cardinals drafted wide receivers John Brown and Walter Powell, and frankly, Williams’ chances to make the team on offense were probably shrinking given the additions. Arians even called Patrick Peterson (below, giving Williams pointers at a recent workout) about the Williams transition.

“Everybody wants me to do it and do it right,” Williams said. “(Arians) knows me as a corner because he met me as a corner.”

Indeed, this is not new ground for Williams. He did not play college football. Williams was a track guy, with excellent speed and a frame (6-foot-1 and 207 pounds) that figured to translate to football. So when he got to the NFL Williams bounced back and forth between positions. He originally signed with the Cowboys as a defensive back, only to be switched to wide receiver. When he went to the Colts, he was a cornerback, which is where Arians met him. But when the Cardinals signed him, they made him a wide receiver before he went down with a season-ending Achilles injury.

One of Williams’ strengths is his ability to play gunner on special teams. That does not change whether his given position is on offense or defense. But his 6-1 size does make him fit well into a cornerback group highlighted by the 6-1 Peterson and the 6-2 Antonio Cromartie and charged to play press man-to-man by Bowles.

“That’s my game,” Williams said. “Give ‘em hell all day.”

Williams switched numbers, from 16 to 29. He said it took all of five minutes to sit in the defensive backs room and to have his comfort come flooding back. “I had a coach tell me when I was in Indy, ‘Same girl, different dress.’ ” Williams said.

The Cardinals have a lot of cornerbacks too, and Williams will have to fight for a spot on that side of the ball too. But he said he is on his way to getting back from the Achilles’ rehab and he expects to be ready for training camp. It’ll just happen to be on the defensive side of the ball.

“It’s not an uncomfortable switch,” Williams said. “The coaches were excited about it so I’m excited about it. It’s always good to be flexible. Maybe someone goes down during a game, you might need someone to run a (wide receiver) route, since Pat’s not going to be doing it anymore. Hey, the more you can do.”

TeddyPPuseblog

 

 


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Is this up next for Patrick Peterson?

Posted by since1898 on May 14, 2014 – 8:51 am

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Peterson will be smart during contract talks

Posted by Darren Urban on May 13, 2014 – 9:48 am

First of all, Patrick Peterson isn’t going to hold out. If that was a question, Peterson stepped on it and killed it when asked about his contract extension situation yesterday.

“There won’t be no holding out for me,” Peterson said. “I want to continue playing football at a high level. … I have two years left so there’s no sense holding out.”

Peterson was holding a presser yesterday to talk about his charity dinner and foundations (all details are at patrickpeterson.org) but inevitably it turned into a discussion about the Pro Bowl cornerback’s contract status. Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman just got a big contract extension, Browns cornerback Joe Haden just received one Tuesday morning, and these days, most consider Sherman, Haden and Peterson the top three young cornerbacks in the game. Peterson is going to need an extension, and while the Cardinals have some time after exercising Peterson’s 2015 team option — hence the “two years left” — it’s coming sooner rather than later.

Peterson, though, understands the process. He talked of working on something “bigger” than just a contract, and insisted he’ll be patient.

“I think I’m definitely well-deserving of a new contract, but at the end of the day it’s a business,” Peterson said. “You’ve got (salary) cap numbers, you’ve got other guys you need to take care of, the rookie pool. All that stuff falls into perspective, but at the end of the day I know (GM) Steve Keim, coach (Bruce) Arians and Mr. (Michael) Bidwill, they want me here for the long haul.”

That’s true. Ask Keim and he couldn’t act more confident that Peterson’s situation will eventually get worked out. Will it get messy? I don’t see it. Peterson is a smart man. He works in the big picture, not unlike teammate Larry Fitzgerald. Fitz has had a couple of uncomfortable contract situations (always with the leverage over the team, but still) and he has deftly worked around any bad feelings it might have caused not only with the team but the fan base. Peterson knows a holdout wouldn’t go over well with anyone and it probably wouldn’t make a huge impact either given how much time is left on his deal.

Instead, he’ll work within the system. And in the end, like Sherman and Haden, he’s gonna get paid.

“They drafted me for the long haul,” Peterson said. “I want to be that Adrian Wilson of the organization, that Larry Fitzgerald, that Darnell Dockett. I believe I’ve done some great things here early in my career, and I want to be here for a while.”

PetersonContractBLOGPOST

 


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Need, speed, no QB: Day Two wrap

Posted by Darren Urban on May 9, 2014 – 9:12 pm

Four picks and no quarterbacks. People keep wondering if the next draft spot would draw a QB choice and it didn’t. It certainly doesn’t sound like it will happen either, now that the Cardinals have moved into the fourth round. Bruce Arians was asked what he would say to fans who were expecting a quarterback to be picked. Arians was blunt.

“Why?” Arians said.

“We’ve got three pretty good ones and you don’t take quarterbacks if they’re not going to beat out the ones you have,” Arians added. “I know people rate quarterbacks. I’ve been doing this a long time. I like ours better.”

So there’s that. As for some other notes after three more draft picks on the draft’s hump day Saturday:

– As a QB follow, Arians said there was “no doubt” Carson Palmer could play a couple of more years after this one. “Look at Peyton at 38,” Arians said. “The longevity of the athletes today, with the technology in the medical profession, they are going to go a lot longer. As long as you stay injury-free.”

– The Cardinals don’t want to draft for need. Then the first three picks go to a safety, a tight end and a pass rusher and that certainly felt like need.

“That’s the emphasis you put into building that (120) board,” GM Steve Keim said. “We say best player available, but there is an emphasis on who impacts our football team the most. We are never going to leave a good player to the side, but we will take who impacts us the most.”

– Keim said the Cardinals tried to trade back up into the second round, but could not get a deal done (he did not say who the Cardinals wanted to try and get.) But a trade remains possible Sunday when the Cardinals have a pick in the fourth, fifth and sixth round. “The phone has been ringing a lot,” Keim said. “We’ve been active.”

– The Cardinals’ two third-round picks echoed exactly what Keim has been talking about this offseason, which is adding speed. Defensive end/outside linebacker Kareem Martin is 6-foot-6 and 272 pounds and Keim compared his frame to the 6-8, 284-pound Calais Campbell when Campbell came out in 2008. Now, Campbell weighs 305. Martin can rush from the outside in the base 3-4 and be both places in sub-packages. More importantly, he has the size and speed that is difficult to find. Keim also said he wanted to get longer and more athletic on the edges, better to chase down the Colin Kaepernicks and Russell Wilsons of the world.

– The other third-round pick was a stunner. “Got to keep you guys on your toes with a small-school guy,” Keim quipped. That’s exactly what it was when Pittsburg State wideout John Brown was picked. But it didn’t take much research to see Brown, at 5-foot-10 and a 4.34 40, was the Cardinals’ attempt to find Arians another T.Y. Hilton. Arians loved him some T.Y. in Indy in 2012. Keim’s been looking for a clone since. Arians also compared Brown in some ways to another of his former wideouts, Pittsburgh’s Antonio Brown. He’s older — 24 — but they love his makeup and his speed.

– It’s not surprising that Arians said he plans to cut back on Patrick Peterson’s punt returns. There are enough other guys on the roster now, with Brown and Ted Ginn, to do it that you wouldn’t risk your Pro Bowl cornerback. Arians acknowledged the Tyrann Mathieu injury had an impact on that thinking. Plus Peterson isn’t going to play wide receiver most likely, but after adding pieces at receiver, it doesn’t make a lot of sense anyway.

– What’s left Sunday Saturday? (It’s been a long day.) Assuming the Cards stick with three picks, I wouldn’t be surprised with an offensive lineman. Beyond that, we’ll see. Obviously I’m not counting on a QB. Maybe another guy for the front seven. Then it’s time to get this roster together for the full offseason.

 


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#ThrowbackThursday – Patrick Peterson at the NFL Combine

Posted by since1898 on May 1, 2014 – 9:03 am

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Lasting thoughts from the first

Posted by Darren Urban on April 30, 2014 – 10:54 am

The first Cardinals draft I covered as a beat guy was back in 2001, which just so happened to be the highest pick the Cards have had since I have been around the team — second overall. That’s 13 drafts overall and 14 first-round picks. As the Cards get closer to this year’s draft (jeez, is it ever going to get here?) I thought I’d hit the first-round picks I’ve seen, with both my initial thoughts at the time and what hindsight has brought.

2001: T Leonard Davis. It was a no-brainer. Davis was a sure thing, taken right after Michael Vick. He’d be the 10-year left tackle the Cardinals sought since Lomas Brown had left. Bigg (he went by the nickname “Big” and at some point, started adding an extra “g”) was just that, a mammoth man. Sure, the Cards decided to play him at guard his first season, but that was so he could get used to the game. Dave McGinnis even brought myself and Kent Somers to his office one day to show us Davis manhandling a couple of defenders. I remember him totally rag-dolling Bears safety Mike Brown on one play. Problem was, he never really panned out as a left tackle, even though Denny Green insisted on shoe-horning him there. He was a better guard, and the Cards weren’t going to break the bank on a guard, so he later got big money from the Cowboys. And made the Pro Bowl. As a guard.

2002: DT Wendell Bryant. What I really remember is hearing how then-defensive line coach Joe Greene had been so impressed with Bryant the player and the person during a workout up in Wisconsin. Uh, yeah, not so much. Bryant was a holdout until the regular season started of his rookie year, and he never climbed out of that hole. A total bust.

2003: DE Calvin Pace and WR Bryant Johnson. Ahh, the everyone-assumed-Terrell-Suggs-was-coming-to-the-Cards draft. This was the most surprising first round. The Cards traded down from No. 6 overall, thinking in part they could get DE Jerome McDougle. The Eagles jumped to No. 15 to get McDougle, and the Cards reached for Pace at 17 and then took Johnson at 18. Pace ended up a decent player, although he didn’t really hit his stride until Ken Whisenhunt showed up. This was a thank-goodness-for-Anquan-Boldin-in-the-second-round class.

2004: WR Larry Fitzgerald. And to think, if Josh McCown’s pass falls incomplete, would it have been Eli Manning? Or would Denny Green have made sure Fitz was No. 1 overall?

2005: CB Antrel Rolle. This was pretty straight-forward. Rolle was considered a top-10 talent, the Cards needed a corner. The problem was Rolle came into the league with most assuming he’d be better at safety. He was.

2006: QB Matt Leinart. Green said when the pick was made that Leinart falling to the Cards at 10 was really a “gift from heaven.” Seems really silly now. But it wasn’t at the time. (The Cards likely would have taken Jay Cutler, who went No. 11, if Leinart had been off the board.) Truth be told I thought it was a good pick, and I was convinced he would be that QB the Cards needed after his first two starts, come-from-ahead losses — but not his fault — to Kansas City and Chicago (“We let ‘em off the hook!”) Time proved I was way wrong. But it allowed Kurt Warner’s rebirth, so there’s that.

2007: T Levi Brown. The Cards wanted a left tackle. Joe Thomas was already taken. The Cards already had Edgerrin James, so Adrian Peterson didn’t make enough sense. And I’ll move on.

– 2008: CB Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie. DRC was odd. He was raw. He was good. He frustrated sometimes, going from Pro Bowl talent to a guy who wouldn’t pay attention in stretches. But it was the right call. If only he hadn’t been the price for Kevin Kolb …

– 2009: RB Beanie Wells: Beanie was never really healthy. A prime example of why teams don’t look to running backs early anymore.

– 2010: NT Dan Williams. Williams has been a starter and has improved. He forms a nice tandem with Alameda Ta’amu. Funny, the biggest thing I remember of when the Cards took him was that Tim Tebow was picked right before him — virtually eliminating any chance he was going to get mentioned on national TV broadcasts.

– 2011: CB Patrick Peterson. Yeah, a good pick. Obvious, but good.

– 2012: WR Michael Floyd. He’s turned into a good player in a short time. He wasn’t the left tackle everyone said they wanted, but he was better than the tackles on the board.

– 2013: G Jonathan Cooper. Coop should turn out to be a wise choice. If any of the big three tackles had been left at No. 7, the Cards probably would have nabbed one, but GM Steve Keim was about best players, and he believes Cooper was that.

BiggUSE

 


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